Forbes EMCVoice: What Is The New Sharing Economy?

Forbes & EMC - Version 2Earlier this week my second guest post for Forbes EMCVoice was published. Stepping away from Big Data – the subject of my previous article – I instead took a look at the emerging business model that is the Sharing Economy. Rather than being a new hippy movement that wants to radicalise the economic norm, this is a social movement that disrupts current thinking and has led to a burst of activity in the start-up scene. So much so that it is now have a lasting effect on corporate America. In a time of economic stagnation, the sharing economy is finding value in the excess and the redundant. If you haven’t heard about it, read on. The question isn’t whether this is a fad, it’s not; it’s simply a question of how will it affect your business and what you will do about it.

Here’s a short excerpt:

The start of June saw the influential LeWeb conference make its way back to London. The subject this time around: the new sharing economy. Never shy of investigating emerging trends within the technology sector, the forum’s excursion into what seems to be a more philosophical realm could be viewed as a departure from the norm, but is it? The truth is that the ideas behind the sharing economy have their roots deeply entrenched in technological soil.

‘The Sharing Economy’ — you would be excused if you thought it sounded like the spiritual home of new age digital hippies, or maybe a step up from a barter system — might sound a million miles from traditional capitalist thinking. But in truth it’s a movement born and sustained by three things: the advance of technology, the ongoing economic pressures that face businesses, and the human imperative for simplicity.

Read the full article over at Forbes.

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Forbes EMCVoice: Who Should Be Driving Big Data?

Forbes & EMC - Version 2Tuesday saw my first article published on Forbes, covering the subject of Big Data for EMC. Big Data initiatives are often thought of as technology projects, but that misconception is one of the big reasons why these projects fail to deliver the big results that are expected. This article looks at how you can avoid falling into that trap.

Every day the number of ways in which we can collect data grows, from personal data collected by exercise gadgets such as Fitbit Flex and Nike FuelBand, to the social interactions that we engage in online through Facebook, Google and Twitter.This is on top of the transactional data that organizations have been collecting in back-end finance systems. It’s a mass of data that offers a mass of possibilities. These big data sets can give companies the ability to understand their customers, their environment and themselves in greater depth than ever before, and that understanding can generate real competitive advantage.

But before we all reach for this great panacea, a reality check. As Ben Elowitz pointed out in his AllThingsD article, “Big Data is Booming, but Big Results are lacking.” That’s not entirely true, but it’s a valid point, as getting the best out of Big Data requires an organization that has thought through the issues and put the right structure in place to execute.

Read the full article over at Forbes.