Writing by James

Articles and opinions on technology, social media and innovation

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Central Desktop’s greatest blog hits of 2013

I’ve really enjoyed writing for Central Desktop this year; they always set interesting briefs and have an open attitude to different approaches. Last year I was lucky enough to have one of the top five most popular articles on the site, with Eight tips on successful adoption of collaboration solutions coming in at number 4.

Well, the 2013 results are now in and I’m very pleased to say that this year I’ve gone one better, with the third most popular post of the year. CMO vs. CIO? The future of marketing + IT was published back in February and was featured on the main page of the Central Desktop site for a few weeks, which definitely helped. The article looks at how the two roles are coming closer together, with technology playing a much bigger part in the marketing mix. Here’s an extract:

Just a few years ago, asking the question whether the CIO and CMO roles were merging would have been madness. They couldn’t have been further apart. The CMO was a key part of a company’s leadership team, driving performance and changing the course of the organization, while in most cases the CIO didn’t even have a seat at the table.

That’s no longer the case – or, at least, that’s what we’ve been led to believe. If you believe Gartner’s January 2012 report entitled “By 2017 the CMO will Spend More on IT Than the CIO” and IBM’s annual CIO surveys, it would seem these two roles are on a collision course. Is it true?

It’s great to be able to write an article that people value, so I was pleasantly surprised to also feature on the Lifetime Achievement list (for articles from previous years that have been read most times in 2013). Why you should keep IT off your cloud made the case for including IT in the decision making process for cloud systems, even though it might seem that they don’t need to be involved. It got a great reaction from commentators, in IT and beyond.

Cloud systems – the perfect opportunity to take control of your processes and practices. A system that can boost your productivity and that you can mold to your exact requirements, all without the interference of IT. No infrastructure requirements, no development, no overcomplicated business analysis and project management – just the appointment of a vendor who can take away the pain and make things happen.

Or is it?

If you just read the headlines and looked no further, you would think that IT was to blame for most of the more public IT failures. The term IT has become synonymous with the department that shares its name, and as a result it has a terrible reputation: one that is based in misconceptions and stereotypes. Here are four reasons why you should break out of this fallacy and involve IT when implementing cloud solutions.

I look forward to writing more next year, but in the meantime, if you want to see more of the top articles from 2013, you can see them at Central Desktop.


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Central Desktop: Cloud App Usage in the Workplace

Skynet - Central DesktopRogue cloud apps – it all sounds a little ominous, as if Skynet will be raising its ugly self-aware artificially-intelligent head sometime soon. Of course, it’s nothing of the sort; it’s just a bunch of employees trying to bring the some of the benefits of consumer life into the workplace, and why shouldn’t they?

In my latest article for Central Desktop, I look at how you can make cloud applications work for you, rather than giving you a headache, and make a plea for IT departments to drop the “command and control” attitude and start collaborating.

Here’s the obligatory extract:

Cloud busting. No, not the fabulous Kate Bush song, but rather what most IT departments would like to be doing. Personal clouds and cloud apps are subjects of growing concern to corporate business, something highlighted in Forbes columnist Joe McKendricks’ article “Corporate Crackdown on Rogue Clouds Has Begun, Survey Suggests” – based on the PMG “Cloud Sprawl 2013′” survey. The trouble is, as always, that numbers only tell one side of the story, and articles wrapped in jargon and littered with percentages aren’t always helpful.

The questions we should be asking ourselves are: what is this really telling us and what should we be doing about it?

Read the full article over at Central Desktop.


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Central Desktop: Why you should keep IT off your cloud

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I’m on a roll at the moment, working on a lot of guest posts, so apologies for the lack of updates right here on the blog: there will be more in the next few weeks. Having said that, here’s the latest article at Central Desktop: Why you should keep IT off your cloud (if you don’t want to make the most of the opportunity.)

It’s something that’s close to my heart as an IT nerd – the changing face of IT and why you should keep them close when implementing cloud services. I promise, we are useful. What’s more, you also get to watch a clip from the brilliant UK sitcom, The IT Crowd.

Here’s a short extract:

Cloud systems – the perfect opportunity to take control of your processes and practices. A system that can boost your productivity and that you can mold to your exact requirements, all without the interference of IT. No infrastructure requirements, no development, no overcomplicated business analysis and project management – just the appointment of a vendor who can take away the pain and make things happen.

Or is it?

Here are four reasons why you should break out of this fallacy and involve IT when implementing cloud solutions.

Read the full article at Central Desktop.


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Central Desktop: Security and Privacy in the Cloud

Logo for Central DesktopMyths perpetuate, but your internal processes cause the biggest risk in cloud services

Another guest post went live at Central Desktop yesterday. This time looking at the misconceptions around the security of cloud services. It’s often thought that the cloud solutions is inherently insecure, but it’s much more likely that the security breach will occur through lax processes or simple human error within the client organisation.

Here’s a short extract:

Cloud services: the future of computing and service provision or simply one more headache? If you read enough press, you’ll be convinced that both are true. In reality, when you remove the opinions and biases, the truth is in between, but probably not in the way that you would expect.

Read the full article at Central Desktop.


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Central Desktop: Are ad agencies ready for the cloud?

Logo for Central DesktopA new guest post has gone live at Central Desktop this evening. Are Ad Agencies Ready for the Cloud examines the ways in which agencies can harness cloud services to increase their business agility. Here’s a short extract:

Businesses love their agencies. Why? Because they have three perceived qualities that bigger organizations want to reclaim: creativity, innovation and agility. But do agencies really have these qualities or are they, for all the slick presentations and trendy ideas, just as wedded to old working methods as everyone else?

You can read the full article at Central Desktop.